News Monitor

10 Children's Books That Paved The Way For A New Queer Protagonist





In Kendrick Daye and Myles E. Johnson’s Large Fears, Jeremiah Nebula may not be a bullfrog. But he is the queer, black protagonist of a children’s picture book -- a genre traditionally dominated by heterosexual, cisgender, white characters. Although the politics of representation is an issue for all literary forms, parent sensitivity has made materials for young readers particularly resistant to plots that question gender, sexuality or the institution of the family.

Daye and Johnson were frustrated with those age-old patterns, so they decided to create new ones. Their recent Kickstarter campaign casts the project as both subtle and radical. Jeremiah, they say coyly, is just a boy who loves pink. But they also stress how his queer, black identity makes him “a character that defies gender roles, race politics, sexuality, and his fears.”

Jeremiah’s story builds on over 30 years of children’s books that portray LGBTQ characters, translating complex issues of gender and sexuality to an accessible, picture-heavy format. These books, though, reveal far more than cutesy anecdotes. They are instructional, cathartic, and ethical, explaining different family models, connecting children with LGBTQ identities or parents to fictional counterparts, and teaching values of acceptance at impressionable ages.


Jenny Lives with Eric and Martin by Susanne Bösche (1981)
This black-and-white Danish photobook was arguably the first to feature gay characters. Two men raise their daughter, Jenny, whose biological mother lives nearby and visits from time to time. Most events are normal children’s books fare like laundry-folding and surprise birthday parties. But the characters also deal with a homophobic comment from a stranger in the street.


Heather Has Two Mommies by Lesléa Newman and Diana Souza (1989)
Like Bösche’s story, this one follows a child with same-sex parents. New plot points include artificial insemination and an inclusive discussion at Heather’s playgroup about different family structures. In real-life playgroups, the response to this book was far less benign: the story rocked the U.S., and the resulting controversy led to extensive parodies including a "Simpsons" version: “Bart Has Two Mommies.”


Asha’s Mums by Rosamund Elwin, Michele Paulse and Dawn Lee (1990)
Asha needs to get a permission slip signed by her mother, but she is perplexed when she must decide which of her two moms to ask. While Heather was lucky enough to have an accepting playgroup, Asha confronts a far less hospitable school -- and world. It’s a tale for anyone whose family does not fit into educational bureaucracy, and Asha’s African-Canadian identity marks a decisive step away from lily-white characters.


Daddy’s Roommate by Michael Willhoite (1991)
You might recognize the name from the 2008 presidential campaign when it “came out” that Sarah Palin, back in her 1995 councilwoman days, had said the book should not be permitted in public libraries. Why? There’s a gay relationship between the the father and his new roommate-actually-boyfriend, Frank. Plus it all starts off with a divorce and arrives at a pretty clear message: “Being gay is just one more kind of love.”


King & King by Linda De Haan and Stern Nijland (2002)
Originally published in Dutch, this book offered both a new take on the royal marriage story, with a gay child rather than just gay parents. “I've never cared much for princesses,” says the princely protagonist, as he finds a series of potential wives paraded in front of him by his wedding-hungry mother. Then, he spots one of the princesses’ brothers. They are soon crowned King and King, and the story ends with a subversive same-sex kiss -- which launched a series of conservative campaigns to ban the book.


One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads by Johnny Valentine and Melody Sarecky (2004)
Instead of focusing on a single storyline, the book features two kids comparing different paternal figures. “Blue,” it turns out, is a not-so-subtle euphemism for “gay,” and the children slowly come to the realization that all skin-colors and sexual identities are equally valid. (Bonus points for the enchanting Seussical rhyming scheme.)


And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell and Henry Cole (2005)
A tale of two male penguins who are chick-less until a zookeeper helps them adopt Tango from a heterosexual couple. Animals are always one of the easier ways to discuss unconventional storylines, but that didn’t stop Singapore from banning the book along with two others last year. In fact, it’s ranked third on ALA’s list of “Most challenged books of the 21st century,” which is hard to explain considering how heartwarming these polar birds are. Did we mention it’s based on real gay penguins at the Central Park Zoo?


10,000 Dresses by Marcus Ewert and Rex Ray (2008)
Bailey is a boy by day who, at night, dreams of cross-dressing. His night-time escapades are rebuked by his family, until he finds a seamstress in playmate Laurel. Bailey’s story is an early forerunner to Jeremiah’s, for it broke from the gay-character plot to examine what it meant to be a gender-queer child.


My New Mommy by Lilly Mossiano and Sage Mossiano (2012)
Who says transgender identity can’t be explained to young children? Four-year-old Violet has a transitioning father who carefully walks her -- and us -- through the process. Like Daye and Johnson, Mossiano was frustrated with the lack of children’s materials, so she took matters into her own hands. She challenged herself to make the content accessible to a young audience, but the real challenge is the one she posed to traditional portrayals of gender in children's books.


Call Me Tree by Maya Christina Gonzalez (2014)

The third in a trilogy that opted for gender neutral pronouns, providing what the writer called a “much needed break from the constant boy-girl assumptions and requirements.” Gonzalez took another decisive step away from the “gay parent” trend and gave us an unambiguously ambiguous gender-queer character. Her engagement with the Chicano identity also departed from the classic whiteness of LGBTQ children’s characters.


Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress by Christine Baldacchino and Isabelle Malenfant (2014)

Like Bailey, Morris has a penchant for gender-queer behavior. He loves to wear the title’s orange garment but his fashion choices leave him open to relentless teasing from his classmates. Tensions escalate, and Morris becomes physically ill from the psychological pain. Though his imagination helps him triumph in the end, the book’s real triumph is that it gives a harsh and realistic account of queer bullying.



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Steve Bell on Iain Duncan Smith's benefits shakeup – cartoon

a href="http://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2015/may/28/steve-bell-on-iain-duncan-smiths-benefits-shakeup-cartoon"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Steve Bell on Iain Duncan Smith's benefits shakeup – cartoon

FEED - The Guardian - 38 min 47 sec ago
a href="http://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2015/may/28/steve-bell-on-iain-duncan-smiths-benefits-shakeup-cartoon"Continue reading.../aimg width='1' height='1' src='http://feeds.theguardian.com/c/34708/f/663828/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/mf.gif' border='0'/br clear='all'/br/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/1/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/1/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/2/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/2/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/3/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/rc/3/rc.img" border="0"//abr/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/a2.htm"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/a2.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/ach.htm"img src="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/ach.img" border="0"//aimg width="1" height="1" src="http://pi.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/a2t.img" border="0"/img width="1" height="1" src="http://pi2.feedsportal.com/r/228766094615/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc80f6/sc/26/a2t2.img" border="0"/
Categories: News Monitor

Here's More Proof That We Shouldn't Stereotype Dogs By Breed

If you're hoping that restricting dogs by breed will lead to fewer dog bites, well, you're barking up the wrong tree, according to the author of a study published last month in The Veterinary Journal.

Páraic Ó Súilleabháin -- a doctoral candidate in psychology at National University of Ireland, Galway, who focuses on human/canine interactions -- looked at government-collected hospitalization records to see if dog bites had gone up or down since Ireland imposed breed-based dog regulations in 1998.

What Ó Súilleabháin found might come as a surprise to those who still believe breed specific legislation, or BSL, leads to safer communities: Hospitalizations due to dog bites have gone up since Ireland's Control of Dogs regulations went into effect.

Under this legislation, 11 types of dogs -- like Staffordshire bull terriers, American pit bull terriers, Rottweilers and Dobermans, plus related mutts -- must be muzzled and on a short leash in public, and walked by someone over the age of 16.

The law was intended to reduce the number of dog bites. It hasn't worked, Ó Súilleabháin tells The Huffington Post -- and may even be contributing to the increase in bites, by encouraging the misperception that keeping some dog breeds muzzled is the beginning and the end of dog bite prevention.

"Bites have been continuously rising since its introduction in Ireland," Ó Súilleabháin said. "In reality, BSL could very well be adding to the likelihood of people being hospitalized."

Here's a visualization of the number of dog bites per 100,000 people since Ireland's BSL went into effect, according to Ó Súilleabháin's findings. The Irish Times published two other tables of the results, showing both increases in the per capita number of dog bites and the number of dog bites overall.

HuffPost caught up with Ó Súilleabháin -- himself the owner of a Rottie named Rory -- by email to find out more.

The Huffington Post: What questions were you looking to answer in your paper, and what was your conclusion?

Ó Súilleabháin: I wanted to find out if a reduction in the most serious dog bites in Ireland -- hospitalizations over a number of days -- has occurred since the [breed specific] regulations were brought into law.

The main conclusion, which is in line with research internationally, is that breed specific legislation is not effective in reducing serious dog bites. Very serious dog bites in Ireland have significantly increased and are continuing to do so. Children under 10 years are particularly at risk as they accounted for nearly half of all hospitalizations.

There are scientifically valid ways to reduce dog bite incidence rates which have been shown to be very successful. Breed specific legislation is not one of them.

Why might breed specific legislation lead to an increase in the number of dog bites?

The impact it has on people's perceptions [is] that dogs can be categorized as potentially dangerous or not based on appearance -- breed -- [which] will make it more likely for people to have a false sense of security or act differently around non-regulated breeds.

What else would you like people to know about your study?

Regulating dogs based on breed to reduce serious dog bite injuries or fatalities is not an effective way to keep communities safe. It has no basis in scientific evidence and is in fact contrary to it.

For instance, research examining human fatalities due to dog bites over a 10-year period in the U.S. found that the only contributing factors to a fatality were under the control of the owner and the victim.

How has BSL affected you personally?

I am unable to walk my dog and interact/play with him in public when he must wear a muzzle. Of course should he need to be muzzled for any valid reason he would be. His personality [is] ideal for therapy/assistance work, [but] he's unable to work in hospitals, nursing homes, clinical psychology settings and schools for autism, etc., due to having to wear a muzzle.

Ideally I would like to work to establish a dog therapy program and -- in line with other international therapy programs -- have it open to all breeds, and for a dog’s inclusion to be based on examination and personality assessment.

This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.

Get in touch at arin.greenwood@huffingtonpost.com if you have an animal story to share!



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มอบใบรับรองคาร์บอนฟุตพริ้นท์มังคุด

การประสานงานด้านธุรกิจระหว่างเกษตรกร/กลุ่มเกษตรกร และภาคเอกชนจำเป็นต้องดำเนินการร่วมกันบนพื้นฐานของการยอมรับทั้งด้านปริมาณ คุณภาพ และราคาที่เป็นธรรมทั้งสองฝ่าย
Categories: News Monitor

Mind Your Body: My Interview With Celebrity Trainer Joel Harper

FEED - The Huffington Post - 51 min 18 sec ago
As we approach summer and bathing suit season, I see more and more clients who are trying to drop the extra few pounds they may have put on during the long cold winter. They feel fat, unhealthy, and unattractive and their sense of self and how they think about themselves is negative. As a result, they lack motivation, direction, and the knowledge to successfully embark on an exercise program. One of the biggest oversights I see when it comes to getting into shape is the mind. An exercise program that doesn't address underlying psychological issues and motivation will not be effective long term and in many cases won't even lead to short term results.

I had the pleasure of discussing this topic with my friend Joel Harper, celebrity fitness trainer and author of a recently published book, Mind Your Body. Among Joel's clients are Dr. Mehmet Oz, legendary music producer Clive Davis, many other stars, as well as everyday people. In his book he gives great advice for maximizing your efforts and using your mind to help accomplish your goals. Here's part of my conversation with Joel:



How did you become a trainer to the stars?

I have a background in acting and a lot of my friends from when I first came to New York have become famous. All of my clients can bring guests to their sessions, so that helps spread the word and get new clients. I make workout DVDs and they are great for actors or musicians when they are on set or tour. Plus living in New York City doesn't hurt either.

What motivated you to write Mind Your Body?


I started working on it about 10 years ago but was overwhelmed with all the fitness and nutrition books on the market. I wanted to do something unique and not waste any trees or the reader's time. One day I got fed up with all the conflicting irresponsible information out there and how confusing and frustrating it was for thousands of people. I wanted to create a rock solid one stop shopping program that worked. I was determined to use every page wisely and create a book that had everything in it. I want to help people accomplish their goals today, not tomorrow.

What role does the mind play when it comes to getting into shape/weight loss?


Mindset is exactly what is missing in most fitness plans, and I believe that is why most people don't achieve the results they are looking for. It starts off with knowing what you deserve first and foremost. What you think you deserve you are going to achieve. I see over and over again that people who achieve results all have the exact same traits. I break it down to 10 that are achievable for everyone. Follow-Through, Perfectly Imperfect, Realistic and Always Prepared to name a few.

Can you give an example of how the mind can help people's efforts?


Let's use the first one above Follow-Through. The clients I train that innately have this accomplish their goals no matter what. This means they are consistent, which with any fitness program is crucial. Getting in shape is like brushing your teeth. You can't only brush your teeth on Saturday, right? You have to do it every day. People who accomplish their goals do not give themselves the option not to accomplish them.

How can the mind hinder people's efforts?


Negative thinking, cyclical thoughts, and too much noise are all time suckers. I believe we all have the same amount of energy. The only difference is how we use it. If you have two people, let's call them Sally and Jane, and they both start the same day with the same goal to lose 20 pounds. I guarantee you the one with the better attitude is going to achieve her goals much quicker and easier than the one with the negative attitude. Why? The mind takes you exactly where you drive it. The one with the focused and good attitude is going to have her workout done and on to the next activity, while the one who has the draining bad attitude is going to waste her workout and not have used her time wisely.

Is there a difference between a rich celebrity trying to get in shape and average Joe and Jane?


Yes and no. I believe everyone can get into incredible shape staying at home and using their body weight as their gym. You do not need fancy equipment. All you need is the knowledge and the time. The difference is deadlines. I find celebrities have deadlines. If they are shooting August 1 and they have a scene in a swimsuit and they know everyone is going to see them in that swimsuit they are going to get it done. This pressure drives behavior and in turn creates daily consistency.

In your opinion, what' the biggest reason people fail to meet their fitness/weight loss goals?


Deep down inside they don't feel like they deserve it. In my book I call this "deserve level" and define it as a rating of self-worth, self-respect, and self-esteem for a given category in your life. It's the blessing or permission you give yourself based on what you believe you deserve in your life.

What's one piece of advice you can give readers?


Study what you think you deserve. I teach this to all my clients and it is the root of every goal we have. I created a "deserve level" test for all 10 categories from fitness to work to hobbies. I have found getting in touch with all 10 of these categories creates a well balanced happy individual.

For more tips on healthy living check out my book Be Fearless: Change Your Life in 28 Days.

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9 Books That Redefine 'Crazy'

FEED - The Huffington Post - 51 min 30 sec ago



Everyone is a little bit 'crazy.' At least that's my theory. And as a neurologist, I'm quasi-educated on the matter. Do I include myself in that statement? Of course I do! I wouldn't be a writer if I hadn't spent some time in therapy. Craziness is in the eye of the beholder, and the line between madness and sanity is often a gray one.

For me, literature has been a way to lessen the stigma of mental illness. Instead of using labels like 'crazy' to define a complex human being, these books present complicated characters who show us the nuances of mental illness, creating compassion and awareness.

Here are nine books that redefine 'crazy':

1. Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn. Our heroine has a troubled past. Her mother had Munchausen syndrome by proxy, literally sickening her daughter's childhood. The heroine's chosen coping mechanism is cutting -- with words. Her skin becomes an encyclopedia of her survival. As an adult, she becomes a reporter who returns to her hometown to find out who is killing girls down there. Thrown back into her mother's grip, she fights to keep herself not only sane, but alive, all while tracking down the killer.

2. Naked by David Sedaris. I warn you now: Do NOT read this book on an airplane, or you will be apologizing to all of your seat mates for your hiccupy, uncontrollable laughter. Making fun of himself (and his family), Sedaris has turned the memoir into a comic art form. In a "Plague of Tics," he enumerates the manifold tics from his Tourette's syndrome, including licking light switches and kissing newspapers, to his own humiliation and his father's ire.

3. Devil In the Details, Scenes from an Obsessive Girlhood by Jennifer Traig. Like Sedaris, this author describes her childhood OCDs, complete with hours of handwashing and a rarity called "scrupulosity," a disorder of hyper-religiousity where a person feels compelled to carry out religious rituals. Coming from a mixed marriage, the author was not actually well-versed in Judaism, so she invents her own pseudo-Jewish rituals, such as putting napkins on her head during meals and creating an original version of kashrut. Her behaviors ultimately lead to a visit to a perplexed rabbi who helps to make the diagnosis.

4. Tweak by Nic Sheff. This book stands out in the pantheon of addiction literature. (Though he also notes that he has bipolar disease, thus carrying a dual-diagnosis, as do many patients with addiction.) Following his father's excellent account of his child's descent into addiction in Beautiful Boy, Nic Sheff gets to tell his own side of the story. From meth binges, dating older actresses and a flirtation with alcoholism, this is one wild, cautionary tale of growing up.

5. Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen. This list would be incomplete without the story of a girl who took a detour through a psych ward on her way to adulthood. The genre is memoir, but the book is just as much a mystery. The question burning through every chapter is, is she actually mentally ill? Kaysen offers evidence both for and against. One of her symptoms, "promiscuity," is hardly convincing. Yet another, depersonalization (where she scratches her skin and demands an X-ray to verify she has bones), seems a bit more so. When Kaysen finally gleans her diagnosis from all her medical records, "Borderline Personality Disorder," the answer is all the more vague and unsettling. We never truly know whether she was "certifiable" or not, which is perhaps the whole point.

6. The Interestings by Meg Wollitzer. In this novel, it is the main character's husband, not the protagonist herself, who suffers from depression. We are given a spyhole view into the spousal experience of depression, which also doubles as a history lesson in its treatment for the last 20 years. Her husband has been successfully treated with difficult-to-use MAO inhibitors -- until he nearly dies from eating food with tyramine (which interacts with this medication). He suffers through years of soul-sucking depression while trying medication after medication, until finally discovering an SSRI that evens out his neurotransmitters and delivers him back to himself.

7. An Unquiet Mind by Kay Jamison. A psychologist who is an expert in bipolar disease discusses her own experience with manic depression. Her unique perspective is at once scholarly and deeply personal. She resists taking Lithium, which slows her mood cycling, but also deadens her energy and highs. Mania is destructive, but at the same time, irresistably enticing. Unfortunately, it is also always followed for her by darkness, months of "pitiless, brackish, almost arterial levels of agony." In the grips of such depression, Jamison takes a massive overdose to assure a "successful" suicide (a success she reasons, "one can live without"), but is luckily thwarted by her brother. After time, she learns to embrace her medication as a gift which allows her to live.

8. It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vinzini. This is a sort of a "Boy Interrupted," with a haunting young voice telling his coming-of-age story in a psych ward. Each daily act during his depression is an effort, even eating or talking. Just being hurts. To lift himself out of this state, he focuses on the "anchors" that ground him while battling the "tentacles" that threaten to pull him back down at every turn. The young boy does beat his depression, but sadly in 2013, the author committed suicide. Sometimes craziness can seem like "kind of a funny story," but sometimes it is just painful and tragic. His story (like The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, as well as Unquiet Mind) serves as a reminder that depression is a real illness which can be fatal.

9. Little Black Lies by Sandra Block. In my new novel, the protagonist is a psychiatrist who sees her own psychiatrist for ADHD and PTSD stemming from childhood memories of her mother dying in a fire. While battling her own demons, she works to help her patients, and sometimes the two worlds collide. Little Black Lies is a novel of memory and madness, where sometimes the truth is more dangerous than the little black lies we tell ourselves just to survive.

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‘หลุยส์’ โต้ดราม่า เรื่องหมวกกันน็อก

กลายเป็นประเด็นขึ้นมาทันทีเมื่อหนุ่ม หลุยส์ สก๊อต โพสต์แสดงความ คิดเห็นเกี่ยวกับกฎหมายใหม่ที่บังคับให้ผู้ขับขี่รถจักรยานยนต์สวมใส่หมวก กันน็อก
Categories: News Monitor

Motherwell blitz Rangers to take big advantage into play-off second leg

FEED - The Guardian - 52 min 42 sec ago
pMotherwell care little for whether Scottish football needs Rangers back in the top flight or not. The debate over the Ibrox club’s worth to the national game has certainly lasted the course – even if the armageddon predicted following their demise three years ago never quite came to pass./ppBut whatever the answer, the discussion may be pondered for at least another season. Stuart McCall, who started the season as Motherwell manager, described a play-off final meeting with his former club as a “nightmare”, and so it proved to be./p a href="http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/may/28/rangers-motherwell-scottish-premiership-play-off-final-first-leg"Continue reading.../aimg width='1' height='1' src='http://feeds.theguardian.com/c/34708/f/663828/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/mf.gif' border='0'/br clear='all'/br/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/1/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/1/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/2/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/2/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/3/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/rc/3/rc.img" border="0"//abr/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/a2.htm"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/a2.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/ach.htm"img src="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/ach.img" border="0"//aimg width="1" height="1" src="http://pi.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/a2t.img" border="0"/img width="1" height="1" src="http://pi2.feedsportal.com/r/228766094416/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc7f98/sc/13/a2t2.img" border="0"/
Categories: News Monitor

Motherwell blitz Rangers to take big advantage into play-off second leg

pMotherwell care little for whether Scottish football needs Rangers back in the top flight or not. The debate over the Ibrox club’s worth to the national game has certainly lasted the course – even if the armageddon predicted following their demise three years ago never quite came to pass./ppBut whatever the answer, the discussion may be pondered for at least another season. Stuart McCall, who started the season as Motherwell manager, described a play-off final meeting with his former club as a “nightmare”, and so it proved to be./p a href="http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/may/28/rangers-motherwell-scottish-premiership-play-off-final-first-leg"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Obtaining Self-Mastery at Frieze Week NYC (PHOTOS)

FEED - The Huffington Post - 53 min 13 sec ago

Artist Chuck Close at Freize Art Fair NYC. Photo by EMS.

Obtaining self-mastery or enlightenment during Frieze week is not an easy mission. Frieze Art Fair New York poses many challenges for art dealers, artists, collectors and its boosters, known as patrons. Most of this is psychological. Think of a confidence course set up of many obstacles one must overcome in a military-style boot camp. At the end of the day you are either enlightened or defeated. I say this because many people in the art world do not understand, or seem to be confused by, the caliber of art these mega fairs exhibit, which is prime real estate for the most coveted works by highly-sophisticated collectors and patronage. I speak of this as someone who has read the social media comments of mainstream art world fanatics making undisciplined remarks on an elite class of art that they cannot yet comprehend or may never understand.


David Zwirner. Photo by EMS.

I think of Frieze as a Ferrari showroom displaying the latest models to the most-vintage collectibles. High-net Ferrari enthusiasts covet the latest Spider to the California T to a vintage Classic or GTO. How about a Rolex Submariner, Yacht-master or Daytona? She may like a Cellini or an Oyster? Or they might just like it all. What about museum collections on the hunt for their prestigious coffers? My point is that Ferraris and Rolexes are not intended for most, but for a select target group that will honor the brands' history and exquisite attention to detail and material. Frieze is a showroom of Ferraris, Tiffany's, and Gulfstreams. There are definitely art fairs for the Buick and Ford enthusiasts, and even wheel barrels, tractors, and roller skates. All of these objects have their own merit and deserve to be honored as well, but during Frieze week you will witness the elite, nothing more, and nothing less.


Jerry Saltz (center) and Jeff Poe (Blum and Poe). Photo by EMS.

Overlooking the East River, Frieze New York completed its fourth annual assignment on Randall's Island Park, Manhattan from May 14th-17th, 2015. Sponsored by Deutsche Bank, Frieze could only be accessed by ferry or expensive taxi and Uber rides. Randall's Island for many Manhattanite art locals was considered "no man's land". I asked one veteran of the art scene, "Why Randall's Island?" His simple response, "Because they can." This remark was in light of the so-called satellite fairs, Art Miami, NADA, and SELECT that were located in much more digestible locations to access during the anointed self-proclaimed "Frieze Week."


Paul Schimmel at the Hauser and Wirth booth.

Though based in Los Angeles, I had the opportunity to photograph Frieze as part of my Take 1 Art Series survey assessment at the VIP opening on Wednesday, May 13th, where the elite of the elite flock to and big-time business is made. The VIP or vernissage hours can be both the most exciting and stressful hours of the fair for everyone involved. Under the bright lights it seemed more Marilyn Manson "The Beautiful People" than Jay Z's "Picasso Baby," especially after a dispute between Shawn Carter and Marina Abramović made headlines during the week when quid pro quo promises alledgedly weren't made. Abramović felt snubbed and made her dissatisfied comments public for participating in Jay Z's 2013 music video for the song, titled "Picasso Baby: A Performance Art Film" that was shot at the Pace Gallery in New York City. Luckily for us all, tempers cooled when the donation was proven to be made - Just a misunderstanding - Just eggs on your face mixed with cocaine and caviar. No harm, no foul, after all - this is the unregulated cynical side of the art world.


David Kordansky. Photo by EMS.


Susanne Vielmetter. Photo by EMS.

Doing reconnaissance during elite art fairs like Frieze and Basel, reminds me of Fellini's 8 ½. One has a euphoric feeling of wonderment like Marcello Mastroianni in the film, navigating beautiful people, beautiful dealers, beautiful art, all being fast tracked into history. I've recently compared LA's art scene to a Michael Bay film, while Luc Besson could direct Frieze. La femme Nikita deliberately purchasing art down the rows of international galleries, single minded, super aware, front-sight-focus - on double espresso. Feeling like Mastroianni and Nikita, all I could think about was the target rich environment called Frieze that had so many high value targets posing as low hanging fruit for me to photograph.


Sheikh Mohammed Rashid Al-Thani and Nancy Gamboa. Photo by EMS.

At Frieze, I ran into the young, astute collector Sheikh Mohammed Rashid Al-Thani. Mohammed is generally arm in arm with his BFF, art advisor Veronica Fernandez, but opening day, I found him doing the rounds with Fernandez' partner, Nancy Gamboa. Mohammed happens to be the cousin of former Qatari Prime Minister Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al-Thani, the man who bought the Picasso painting Femmes d'Alger (Version "O") for a record $179.4 million at Christie's on May 11th, the Monday of Frieze week.


Francois Ghebaly. Photo by EMS.


Davida Nemeroff of Night Gallery. Photo by EMS.

Mohammed was keen on LA galleries, Blum & Poe, Francois Ghebaly, and Night Gallery and was impressed by the work of LA artists Alex Olson, Julian Hoeber, Calvin Marcus, and Matt Connors. "We were struck by a terrific black and white sculptural wall piece by Julian Hoeber at Blum & Poe. The first in a new series, the work is graphic and appears to be flat from afar, but upon closer inspection, it reveals a surprisingly seductive dimensionality and handcrafted quality,' Nancy Gamboa said. At CLEARING, gallery director and close friend of Mohammed, Harry Scrymgeour, led both through a collection of humorous and provocative figurative drawings by recent UCLA grad Calvin Marcus. Gamboa concluded, "Overall it was a great showing for Los Angeles. LA artists and the galleries that represent them can be proud."


Jeffrey Deitch. Photo by EMS.


Piero Golia art at Bartolami Gallery. Photo by EMS.

Prior to Frieze opening, Sotheby's kicked off the week hosting a dinner on Sunday for MOCA board members and other major collectors. Notable attendees included Adam Sender, Maurice Marciano, Bruce Karatz and Lilly Tartikoff Karatz, Elon Musk and Veronica Fernandez, Nicolas Berggruen, and Cathy Vedovi. The May 12th evening auction featured major works donated by LA art-stars such as Mark Bradford, Mark Grotjahn, Barbara Kruger and Ed Ruscha. The auction raised a stratospheric $22.5M.


Angela Brazda of Lisson Gallery. Photo by EMS.


Tif Sigfrids and Alex Couri. Photo by EMS.

So who sold what and what were some of the numbers? James Cohan Gallery sold a major work by Dutch sculptor Folkert de Jong to Pierre Trahan. LA dealer Jonathan Novak acquired several works by David Shrigley from Anton Kern at Frieze. David Zwirner Gallery featured John McCrackens with prices ranging from $250,000 - $1.8 million. A tall red sculpture by McCracken sold for $850,000. Zwirner is now the exclusive distributor of the Franz West furniture. At the fair the furniture's prices ranged from $30,000 (club chair) to $100,000 (couch), which were at the booth. Zwirner sold two pairs of club chairs (four chairs total, to two collectors), and a set of two club chairs plus a couch to a third collector.


Tim Blum and Sarvia Jasso. Photo by EMS.

Blum & Poe sold Carroll Dunham's (Solar Eruption, 2000-2001) painting for $550,000. Pace Gallery sold seven drawings by Tuttle from his "Aspects' series, which he completed in Maine in the summer of 2014 for $35,000 each. Lehmann Maupin sold an oval photograph measuring 50 x 38.4 inches by Catherine Opie, entitled, Mary, 2012, which was acquired by a prominent Turkish foundation. Hauser & Wirth sold a Paul McCarthy for an even million. Just a few hours into the VIP, all Richard Prince pieces were sold except for one at Gagosian Gallery. They were priced at $90,000 each. Acquavella Galleries sold a painting by Jean Dubuffet for $1 million, a painting by Wayne Thiebaud for nearly $2 million, three works by Jacob El Hanani for $40,000 each, and a gunpowder drawing by Ed Ruscha for over $300,000.


Carla Camacho of Lehmann Maupin. Photo by EMS.


Ken Maxwell of Gagosian Gallery. Photo by EMS.

The Whitney Museum also opened its doors at its new location in the West Village/Meatpacking District on May 1st. The Whitney was well attended during Frieze week, on the to-do-list for most people attending the fairs, especially since it featured its inaugural show "America Is Hard to See." The exhibition "takes the inauguration of the Museum's new building as an opportunity to reexamine the history of art in the United States from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present." Many Angelenos were proud to see California artists well represented: Larry Bell, Ed Ruscha, Lari Pittman, John McCracken, Wayne Thiebaud and Chris Burden (who sadly passed away at the beginning of Frieze week on May 10 at age 69).


Larry Bell at the Whitney. Photo by EMS.

Finally, people were talking about LA-native Fawn Rogers' new exhibition entitled "Court," which was on view during Frieze at both NADA and Select Art Fairs. Rogers' installation at SELECT art fair featured and courted collectors and artists alike, and was mentioned to me many times during the week there as something I should check out. Housed within a boho-chic tent installation, the exhibition was comprised of archival, limited edition double-sided works drawn from the artist's 55 original paintings featuring images of influential art collectors presented as a deck of playing cards, accompanied by standard-sized decks, opulent seating, and traditional gaming paraphernalia. "Court" attracted a number of high-profile collectors, including Bodo Korsig and Steve Shane, who playfully turned Rogers over his knee to scold her for not including him in the deck. Prior to installation, Peter Eleey from MoMA PS1 was the first to snap photos of several of the cards to share with collectors, and many visitors later followed suit. Following the fair, MoMA board member A.C. Hudgins perused the deck, retrieved a card featuring Agnes Gund, and said, "This is a very special, extraordinary person; you should meet her."



Fawn Rogers at SELECT Art Fair. Photo by EMS

One of the original "Court" paintings also made an appearance in a high-stakes, winner-take-all poker game in which artists Melissa Brown, Fawn Rogers, Ellen Altfest, Josh Abelow, Andrew Kuo, Glen Baldrige, and Gina Beavers wagered original works of fine art at NADA. Several limited edition decks of the standard-size Art Patron Playing Cards (sold at the gift shop for $40 on the recommendation by Alex Galan of Artbook/D.A.P. and Trunk Archive) were stolen while Rogers spoke with NADA fair director Heather Hubbs five meters away. Surrounded by an atmosphere inspiring art thievery and texts among billionaires, collector Martin C. Liu's appraisal of "Court" as "very clever... better than I've seen at the fair" seems like a warranted observation.

This article is part of an ongoing photojournalism survey of art exhibition openings titled EMS N(art)rative. Through my lens I document a photographic essay or visual "N(art)rative" that captures the happenings, personalities, collectors, gallerists, artists and the art itself; all elements that form the richly varied and textured fabric of the SoCal art world. This reconnaissance offers a unique view for serious art world players to obtain news and information on the current pulse of what's in the now, yet capturing timeless indelible images for posterity and legacy. Here is EMS N(art)rative Twenty-Five.

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Categories: News Monitor

Worcester’s final win over Bristol adds to injustices of play-off system

Winner-takes-all approach offers no consolation to the loser, with teams like Northampton enjoying fine seasons only to end with nothing to show for it. Could such heartaches be lessened with a lesson from Super League?pApril the cruellest month? Make it May, the month of the play-offs. Last Saturday Northampton, long‑time leaders and the best team in the Premiership, a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/23/saracens-northampton-premiership-semi-final-match-report" title=""had their season taken away/a. On Wednesday, Bristol, leaders of the Championship for probably 75% of the season after beating us on the opening day, were the better side on the night, a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/27/worcester-bristol-championship-play-off-final-second-leg" title=""but over 160 minutes came up short/a. So Worcester go up and they spend another season dreaming of the Premiership./pp spanRelated: /spana href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/27/worcester-bristol-championship-play-off-final-second-leg"Worcester beat Bristol with last kick to secure promotion to Premiership/a /p a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2015/may/28/worcester-bristol-rugby-play-off-injustices-dean-ryan"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Worcester’s final win over Bristol adds to injustices of play-off system

FEED - The Guardian - 54 min 1 sec ago
Winner-takes-all approach offers no consolation to the loser, with teams like Northampton enjoying fine seasons only to end with nothing to show for it. Could such heartaches be lessened with a lesson from Super League?pApril the cruellest month? Make it May, the month of the play-offs. Last Saturday Northampton, long‑time leaders and the best team in the Premiership, a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/23/saracens-northampton-premiership-semi-final-match-report" title=""had their season taken away/a. On Wednesday, Bristol, leaders of the Championship for probably 75% of the season after beating us on the opening day, were the better side on the night, a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/27/worcester-bristol-championship-play-off-final-second-leg" title=""but over 160 minutes came up short/a. So Worcester go up and they spend another season dreaming of the Premiership./pp spanRelated: /spana href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/may/27/worcester-bristol-championship-play-off-final-second-leg"Worcester beat Bristol with last kick to secure promotion to Premiership/a /p a href="http://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2015/may/28/worcester-bristol-rugby-play-off-injustices-dean-ryan"Continue reading.../aimg width='1' height='1' src='http://feeds.theguardian.com/c/34708/f/663828/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/mf.gif' border='0'/br clear='all'/br/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/1/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/1/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/2/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/2/rc.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/3/rc.htm" rel="nofollow"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/rc/3/rc.img" border="0"//abr/br/a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/a2.htm"img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/a2.img" border="0"//abr/a href="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/ach.htm"img src="http://adchoice.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/ach.img" border="0"//aimg width="1" height="1" src="http://pi.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/a2t.img" border="0"/img width="1" height="1" src="http://pi2.feedsportal.com/r/228767792235/u/60/f/663828/c/34708/s/46bc6f7c/sc/13/a2t2.img" border="0"/
Categories: News Monitor

สรุปข่าวเด่น 28 พ.ค. 58

เดลินิวส์ออนไลน์ รวบรวมข่าวสารสำคัญที่กำลังเป็นกระแสร้อนแรงในสังคมตลอดช่วงวันที่ 28 พ.ค. 58 มาสรุปให้ทุกท่านได้ติดตามดังนี้
Categories: News Monitor

Don't Put Power Lines Across the Historic James River

FEED - The Huffington Post - 54 min 9 sec ago
By David Weible


There are alternatives to Dominion's current plan to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

Despite the fact that it would destroy the public's enjoyment of a beautiful stretch of river, ruin the historic context of irreplaceable historic assets like Jamestown and Colonial Parkway, and mar a landscape that's been largely unchanged for thousands of years, Dominion Virginia Power still wants to construct high-voltage transmission lines across the James River.

But it doesn't have to be this way. There are alternatives.

Preservation isn't about impeding process. It's about being mindful of our cultural heritage while encouraging progress. It's possible to both protect our history and serve Virginia with the additional power it needs. Let's do both.

Watch this video to learn more about alternative options to Dominion's proposed high-voltage transmission lines.

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Categories: News Monitor

This Unarmed Black Man Is Lucky to be Alive

FEED - The Huffington Post - 54 min 55 sec ago
Every time I hear that a policeman has killed another unarmed black man in the United States, I think about how lucky I am to be alive.

My first interaction with police occurred in the fall of 1995, a few months after I arrived from Kenya. I had just bought my first car. One evening, my cousin asked me to drive him and three high school friends -- two white girls and a white male -- to a video arcade in Milpitas, California. As I pulled into the parking lot, I noticed a police car behind me. The officer followed us as we circled the parking lot looking for a spot. I parked the car, got out and began to walk towards the door.

Two hours later, we left the arcade. As I drove to exit, I noticed a police car behind me. As soon I got on the street, I saw red and blue lights and heard a siren. Before I could pull over, bright flashlights shone directly in my face through the windshield. I stopped in the middle of the street.

An officer on a megaphone began orders. "Turn off the engine. Put hands on your head. With your right hand, roll down your window. Reach over with your right hand and open the door from the outside. Step out of the car. Slowly. Walk backwards."

After a few steps, two officers tackled me to the ground violently and handcuffed me behind my back. They went ransacked my pockets. When they were satisfied that we were not criminals they told me that someone had reported that a vehicle resembling mine was stolen.

For the next 10 years, I didn't protest dozens more cases of such harassment and maltreatment by police. I kept quiet because because I didn't know that as an immigrant I had any rights. I also compared America to Kenya -- where even a minor infraction could land you in jail unless you had a bribe -- and concluded that American cops were saints.


Mugshots from my arrest in Minneapolis, March 22, 2008.

I turned my head, and immediately the officer patting me down squeezed my testicles hard.

But in 2004, I enrolled in a university to study journalism, and my views began to change. I learned that the U.S. constitution accords the same civil rights to all people in the country, regardless of their origin or immigration status. I began to get vocal against my harassment by police. That's when the nights I have spent in jail began.

The scariest of those nights was in the spring of 2008 in Minneapolis, where I had moved to for a job. Earlier in the night, Bill Santiago, a friend I knew from doing comedy in California, had invited me to perform with him at Acme Comedy Club. After the show, I rushed out to catch a bus home. Outside, I ran into Andy Peters, a comedian from Seattle, who had performed with us that night. He, too, was running for the same bus.

We missed the last bus and decided to share a taxi. I stayed back at the bus shelter because as a white man, Peters was more likely to get a taxi to stop. One stopped. He entered. I opened the rear door and sat behind the driver.

"Are you guys together?" the cab driver asked.

"Yes," Peters answered.

The driver asked where we were going. We gave him two destinations. He asked why we weren't going to the same place. We told him we didn't live together. He asked for $20 cash. I gave him a $20 bill. As he began to drive away; I asked why he didn't have the meter running.

"You agreed to the deal," he answered.

"What deal?" I asked.

I had taken a taxi home from the same area many times and my fare was usually under $10. But I gave the driver $20 that night because I had learned that some drivers only accepted cash and would demand $20 up front, run the meter, and you change at the end of the trip. I told the driver that he was ripping us off. He pulled over.

"If you don't like it, get out," he said.

I asked him for a receipt, which he gave me. As he began to drive again, I told him that I would file a complaint against him for ripping us off. He quickly pulled over.

"Get out!" he ordered.

We could have gotten out, but it was cold and snowy. I told him that I might decide not to lodge a complaint if he just drove us home.

"Get out, or I will call the police," he barked.

Before we could decide what to do, he called 911. We decided not to leave, fearing that we might become fugitives for crimes we didn't commit. While on the phone with the 911 dispatcher, the driver saw a police officer about a block away. He ran off and left us waiting in the car. A few minutes later, the cabdriver and the officer approached us. The policeman pointed his taser gun at us and threatened to use it on us if we didn't exit the car. Peters and I jumped out. With the taser still pointed at us, the cop ordered us to get out of the area. As we walked away, we protested that he hadn't given us a chance to tell our story.

"Do you wanna go to jail?" he asked as we walked backward away from him.

"Go to jail for what?" Peters asked.

"Do you want to go to jail?" the cop asked again.

I asked the cop for his badge number, a request I knew was within my rights.

"Open your mouth one more time, and you'll go to jail," he threatened.

As we walked away, I turned to Peters and said, "Remember his squad car number is 989. We have to file a complaint."

The officer rushed towards me and pointed the taser at me.

"Get on the ground," he barked.

I dropped down into the sludge of melting snow. He handcuffed me and ordered me to stand up. I tried to, but I fell because the ground was too slippery. I asked the cop to help me to my feet. He pointed the taser at me and told me to get up again. I made a second attempt but failed again. Another cruiser pulled up. Two cops stepped out. One walked towards us and helped me to my feet. The other went to Peters, who had been protesting my arrest from a distance.

"Keep walking, or you're gonna go to jail," the cop told him.

The two cops walked me to the front of a squad car. The arresting officer ordered me to face the car, spread my legs apart, and not turn my head away from the windshield. He put on latex gloves and began to empty my pockets. As he frisked me, I heard Peters ask why one of the cops had a laser beam from the taser focused on the back of my head. I turned my head, and immediately the officer patting me down squeezed my testicles, hard.

"I told you not to turn your head," he said.

When a man gets kicked or squeezed in the testicles, painful cramps travel from there through the abdomen. As the pain shot through me, I defied him and turned my body around. I looked at the cop in disbelief. I wanted to kick him right where he had squeezed me, but something told me not to. I bit my lower lip hard and tried not to cry. I couldn't. I let tears roll down my cheeks.

The officer took me to jail for disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, and failing to pay a taxi fare I had already paid. When Peters came to bail me out in the morning, he was shocked to learn that the officer had taken away the receipt that could have proven my innocence.

Every time I hear that police have killed an unarmed black man, I think about how differently things would have turned out for me. What if my window couldn't roll down that night a Milpitas cops ordered me to reach over with my right hand to open the door from the outside? What if instead of turning my pain and anger into tears, I had turned around violently and kicked that Minneapolis cop for squeezing my testicles?

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Categories: News Monitor

D.C. Metro Bans 'Issue' Ads After Pamela Geller Submits 'Draw Muhammad' Cartoon

FEED - The Huffington Post - 55 min 6 sec ago
Washington, D.C.'s transit authority has squashed Pamela Geller's dream of plastering a controversial image of Muhammad all over Washington-area Metro stations and buses.

According to news reports, Geller's organization, the American Freedom Defense Initiative, had submitted the $10,000 winning cartoon from a “Draw Muhammad” competition to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority with the caption "Support Free Speech." The contest was attacked by two shooters in Garland, Texas, earlier this month.

WMATA confirmed to The Hill that it is banning all "issue-oriented" ads for the rest of the year -- meaning no ads that convey religious or political messages will be allowed on the transit system.

"In the coming months, Metro will fully consider the impact that issue-related advertisements have on the community by gathering input from riders, local community groups and advocates,” spokesman Michael Tolbert told The Hill. “Metro will also carefully examine the legal concerns related to displaying, or discontinuing the display of, issue-related advertisements.”

The ban will be revisited at the end of the year.

In a statement on her website in response to the decision, Gellar called it an "end run" around the First Amendment.

It’s not the first time Geller and her organization, The American Freedom Defense Initiative, have tried to use bus ads to cast Islam in a negative light. In April, a federal ruling cleared the way for a poster to be placed in New York City's transit system depicting a man with his face wrapped in a keffiyeh, next to the message “Killing Jews is Worship that draws us close to Allah.”


An ad sponsored by the American Freedom Defense Initiative in the New York City subway on Sept. 24, 2012.

Edgar Hopida, the communications director for the Islamic Society of North America, said Geller's plan was an obvious provocation.

"Pamella Gellar has made a career out of demonizing Islam and Muslims," Hopida told HuffPost. "She wants us to be second-class citizens."

The way forward, Hopida says, is to ignore her.

"She wants her 15 minutes of fame and she wants Muslims to react in an ugly way," Hopida said. "What Muslims can do is invite people to learn more about the Prophet Muhammad's life and mission. Education and dialogue is the best way to tackle hate and ignorance."

The Sikh Coalition, an advocacy group, had expressed concerns that the proposed ads could have resulted in the harassment of transit customers who are Muslim or are erroneously perceived as Muslims.

“When you look at that [Draw Muhammad] image, if you don’t have any other context, you’ll see a turban and a beard on a man who is expressing opposition to free speech,” Rajdeep Singh, the coalition’s policy director, told HuffPost. “Given that overwhelmingly, every person in the U.S. who wears a turban is a Sikh, this might have negative repercussions for the Sikh community ... and not just ours, but also Arabs, Muslims, Hindus and the South Asian community.”

Imam Suhaib Webb, resident scholar at an emerging D.C.-area mosque community called MakeSpace, said he was more concerned about the atmosphere of hatred these types of ads can create -- and whether they would result in policies that are discriminatory toward Muslims and other religious minorities.

The best response for Muslims would be to keep doing what they're doing, he said -- meeting up, volunteering for their communities and getting involved in social justice issues.

"I don't think we need to be reactive to her," Webb told HuffPost. "I think we need to continue the great work that is already happening in our community."

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Categories: News Monitor

A Guide to Slovenia's Best Craft Breweries

Despite its size of 20.273 square kilometers, Slovenia is home to roughly around 28 breweries, making it a perfect destination for any beer connoisseur. The two major brands are Union and Lasko, recently bought by Heineken. Avoid getting sucked into the local debate on which of these two is better and rather give these small microbreweries a chance. These are the true stars of Slovenia's beer renaissance.

Bevog Brewery

It's technically produced in Austria, just a few kilometers away from the Slovenian border, but it's owned by a Slovenian. The microbrewery is dedicated to making beers of top fermentation, better known as ales. The owner Vasja Golar claims: "Despite the English roots of ales, we here at Bevog are very creative and do not stick to the established norms. We design our beers in our own way, the way we know is right."
With all the awards they have recently received for both beer and the design of their labels they are apparently doing it right. You can give all their beers a chance at the brewery or get some to take home.

Try: Pale ale Tak -- very tasty and aromatic. It's just a bit bitter at the end, and then it mellows down, beginning for another sip.

Reservoir Dogs


This is one of the youngest microbreweries in Slovenia, located in Nova Gorica. In their case the saying: curiosity trumpets experience, definitely holds true, because despite being young they are certainly making their mark. They've named their beer after the four horsemen of the apocalypse -- a force of nature to be reckoned with, just like their Grim Reaper, IPA and Warriors Pale Ale. As the horsemen, they deliver a blow.

Try: Grim Reaper starts off with an aroma of tropical fruit and then the sweet bitterness takes over.

Mali Grad

A married couple Anja and Urban Florjancic have established their own microbrewery in Kamnik, a few kilometers away from Ljubljana. While husband is in charge of the recipes, they try to further improve them together. In their case being small is not necessarily a disadvantage because they've managed to turn it into a lead, as they pay special attention to the ingredients they use and don't rush the whole process. The results are very delicious bottles of beer.

Try: India Pale Lager (special edition), with a lovely taste full of citruses and it finishes with a bitter bang.

Human Fish

They claim to be the leading family-owned microbrewery in Slovenia. Their glass of IPA was actually my first sample of Slovenian craft beer. You could say I have them to thank for getting hooked and I know for a fact I am not the only one. Their microbrewery is based in Vrhnika, just a few kilometers out of the capital. It is worth mentioning since they offer tours of their place and you can check for yourself to see how the job is being done. They have a wide variety of different beers and are constantly experimenting and trying something new. So, the visit will definitely be inspirational.

Try: Their IPA, which they named "SIPA" (meaning "squid" in Slovenian), hazy orange color of the beer, delicious aroma and a bitter jolt.

Carniola

Rok Rutar is the owner of the Carniola Brewery and he pays special attention to the ingredients he uses. And if you want a uniquely Slovenian experience give his drinks a go, since he primarily uses Slovenian hops. What will also immediately capture your imagination are the pretty cool labels.

Try: ESB, light and refreshing, making it just ideal for the summer.

Pelicon


Voters of Ratebeer website voted them the best beer and brewery in Slovenia in 2014. Matej Pelicon and Anita Lozar opened their microbrewery in the heart of the Vipava valley in Ajdovscina. They launched their first pale ale beer Pally in the November 2013.

Try: They are most famous for their India pale ale beer called the 3rd Pill. But just to make sure how good they are and check if the awards are well deserved you can try the others as well, because their list is getting longer.

This post originally appeared on coolkidzcooltrips.com.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Categories: News Monitor

A Guide to Slovenia's Best Craft Breweries

FEED - The Huffington Post - 57 min 6 sec ago
Despite its size of 20.273 square kilometers, Slovenia is home to roughly around 28 breweries, making it a perfect destination for any beer connoisseur. The two major brands are Union and Lasko, recently bought by Heineken. Avoid getting sucked into the local debate on which of these two is better and rather give these small microbreweries a chance. These are the true stars of Slovenia's beer renaissance.

Bevog Brewery

It's technically produced in Austria, just a few kilometers away from the Slovenian border, but it's owned by a Slovenian. The microbrewery is dedicated to making beers of top fermentation, better known as ales. The owner Vasja Golar claims: "Despite the English roots of ales, we here at Bevog are very creative and do not stick to the established norms. We design our beers in our own way, the way we know is right."
With all the awards they have recently received for both beer and the design of their labels they are apparently doing it right. You can give all their beers a chance at the brewery or get some to take home.

Try: Pale ale Tak -- very tasty and aromatic. It's just a bit bitter at the end, and then it mellows down, beginning for another sip.

Reservoir Dogs


This is one of the youngest microbreweries in Slovenia, located in Nova Gorica. In their case the saying: curiosity trumpets experience, definitely holds true, because despite being young they are certainly making their mark. They've named their beer after the four horsemen of the apocalypse -- a force of nature to be reckoned with, just like their Grim Reaper, IPA and Warriors Pale Ale. As the horsemen, they deliver a blow.

Try: Grim Reaper starts off with an aroma of tropical fruit and then the sweet bitterness takes over.

Mali Grad

A married couple Anja and Urban Florjancic have established their own microbrewery in Kamnik, a few kilometers away from Ljubljana. While husband is in charge of the recipes, they try to further improve them together. In their case being small is not necessarily a disadvantage because they've managed to turn it into a lead, as they pay special attention to the ingredients they use and don't rush the whole process. The results are very delicious bottles of beer.

Try: India Pale Lager (special edition), with a lovely taste full of citruses and it finishes with a bitter bang.

Human Fish

They claim to be the leading family-owned microbrewery in Slovenia. Their glass of IPA was actually my first sample of Slovenian craft beer. You could say I have them to thank for getting hooked and I know for a fact I am not the only one. Their microbrewery is based in Vrhnika, just a few kilometers out of the capital. It is worth mentioning since they offer tours of their place and you can check for yourself to see how the job is being done. They have a wide variety of different beers and are constantly experimenting and trying something new. So, the visit will definitely be inspirational.

Try: Their IPA, which they named "SIPA" (meaning "squid" in Slovenian), hazy orange color of the beer, delicious aroma and a bitter jolt.

Carniola

Rok Rutar is the owner of the Carniola Brewery and he pays special attention to the ingredients he uses. And if you want a uniquely Slovenian experience give his drinks a go, since he primarily uses Slovenian hops. What will also immediately capture your imagination are the pretty cool labels.

Try: ESB, light and refreshing, making it just ideal for the summer.

Pelicon


Voters of Ratebeer website voted them the best beer and brewery in Slovenia in 2014. Matej Pelicon and Anita Lozar opened their microbrewery in the heart of the Vipava valley in Ajdovscina. They launched their first pale ale beer Pally in the November 2013.

Try: They are most famous for their India pale ale beer called the 3rd Pill. But just to make sure how good they are and check if the awards are well deserved you can try the others as well, because their list is getting longer.

This post originally appeared on coolkidzcooltrips.com.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Categories: News Monitor

Warren Pushes Obama To Keep Slavery Ban In Trade Deal

BOSTON -- Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) on Thursday decried efforts by the Obama administration to undermine an anti-slavery measure that the Senate approved last week as part of a major trade bill.

The provision, authored by Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), would bar the U.S. from expediting trade deals with governments that the State Department deems to be among the very worst offenders on human trafficking. The Senate passed the Menendez language late Friday night, despite strident objections from President Barack Obama's administration. Both Obama officials and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) are now working to defang the anti-slavery effort.

The problem for Obama is Malaysia, one of 11 other nations included in the controversial trade talks for the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Malaysia occupies a strategically important position in global shipping routes, but its government has a long history of supporting some of the most abusive forms of human trafficking, earning it a spot on the State Department's official list of the worst abettors of modern slavery.

When asked by The Huffington Post Thursday whether the U.S. should ink trade deals with such countries, Warren responded emphatically in the negative.

"I'll give you a really short answer on that," Warren said. "No."

"This is an opportunity for the United States to use our leverage to get countries like Malaysia to clean up their acts," she added. "We're talking about really horrible violations of human rights. And Malaysia needs to make significant changes if it wants to be part of a trade agreement with other countries."

Earning a State Department designation as a Tier 3 human trafficking violator is no easy task. Malaysia's companions on the list include Iran and North Korea. Other notorious offenders, like Qatar, where hundreds of migrant workers have been killed in recent years, are considered better at fighting human trafficking than Malaysia.

The Guardian reported this week on the discovery of mass graves for trafficking victims in Malaysia. One-third of workers in the nation's burgeoning electronics industry are victims of forced labor, according to the nonprofit group Verite, which works with the State Department on human rights issues. The government is not merely looking the other way -- the State Department has said Malaysia needs to beef up efforts to investigate and prosecute government officials who profit from such exploitation.

Although Warren has long opposed Obama's trade agenda, tensions between the two Democratic leaders erupted into a public feud last month, when Obama attacked Warren's arguments as "dishonest," "bunk" and an effort to spread "misinformation."

Warren responded by calling on Obama to release a draft of the TPP legislation, so that the public could make up its own mind about the trade pact. When Obama opted to keep the deal classified, Warren's office issued a report detailing lax enforcement of labor and human rights standards in trade deals on Obama's watch.

Most of Warren's critique has focused on regulatory issues and a host of academic experts have supported her arguments. Leaked TPP documents have revealed that the pact will include an enforcement mechanism known as Investor State Dispute Settlement, which allows corporations to challenge a country's domestic laws and regulations before an international tribunal. Adverse rulings could require governments to change their laws or pay financial penalties.

But much of the debate over TPP has shifted to human rights issues, due to the unexpected Senate survival of the Menendez ban on slavery. Warren's comments Thursday marked the first time she publicly spoke out on the Malaysian human trafficking issue. Although Obama has touted the TPP as "the most progressive trade bill in history," complete with robust labor and environmental standards, the administration now finds itself seeking to neutralize a human trafficking crackdown to maintain its trade coalition.

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has said that excluding Malaysia from the TPP would take away diplomacy tools that could help fight slavery in the South Pacific nation. But substitute legislation sought by the Obama administration would not actually require the Malaysian government to improve its human trafficking record in order to enjoy trade benefits from the TPP.

Malaysia occupies a strategically important position in the Strait of Malacca, through which a tremendous amount of global commerce currently passes. China, in particular, relies heavily on the oil shipments that pass through the strait. Malaysia has been eager in recent years to contain China's influence in the strait and the neighboring South China Sea.

Zach Carter reported from Washington and Shahien Nasiripour reported from Boston.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Categories: News Monitor